2017 In Review

It’s that time of year when everyone looks back at what’s happened over the last year. Well, who am I to buck a trend? Here’s a look back at Kat’s Crafty 2017.

January saw the end of a six-year run of Iron Craft Challenges. We could so any craft we wanted and I chose to etch some glasses.

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 26

Of course, there was also the January mitten KAL. This year’s mittens were called Under the Sea. I entered them in the Minnesota State Fair and they took second place!

Under the Sea Mittens

I also finished the Alzada shawl to wear to the Yarnover dinner.

I closed out the month with a trip to Iceland where there was a little yarn purchased! Though it wasn’t all for me I promise.

Icelandic Yarny Goodness

In February, I started planning for a large yarnbombing project with the Minnesota Knitters’ Guild at the Minnesota State Fair. I wrote two fair themed patterns for it.

Prize Ribbons

Corn Dogs

Through March I worked on my mittens for the Minnesota Twins’ Opening Day.

Opening Day Mittens

In April I made the HB2 sweater with some of the yarn I bought in Iceland.

June and July were spent getting the Guild’s yarnbombing put together. This is our finished horse, Pronto.

I also had to whip up a 10′ x 6′ backdrop, which took me a week of pretty much nonstop knitting.

In October, my Santa Pillow was released in the Knit Picks book Merry Knitmas. It was my first time having a pattern published in a book!

I also finished the Ravello sweater for myself.

June through November, I hosted the Wee Winter Woolens KAL. It was so fun doing another holiday KAL with my Ravelry group.

In November I started the Spooner sweater. I just love the colorwork in the neck.

I also taught myself how to do stacked increases and decreases so I can start working on Fox Paws. What a challenge!

I turned some cute flannel sheets into Christmas pjs for my husband and I in December.

And I started another yarnbombing project. This time I am knitting a five foot tall cozy for a lamppost in St. Paul as part of Saint Paul Cozy.

Wow, looking at it all like this, I’m really quite proud of all I’ve finished this year! I’m looking forward to knitting off 2018 with a new mitten KAL, Bloomin’ Happy Mittens. Have a great holiday everyone!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 26 – Monogrammed Glasses

For this last Iron Craft challenge we could do whatever we wanted. I used it as a chance to do a project I’ve been wanting to do for awhile, monogramming some glasses with etching cream. Why did I wait so long do this? Well, it’s because the glasses I wanted to monogram are actually the jars our local grocery store’s mustard comes in and I had to wait for Matt to finish up the mustard!
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
This was such a simple project, but I love the finished look. They really don’t look like a DIY at all (or mustard jars for that matter). I have three done and am just waiting for the fourth one to be emptied.

The trickiest part of this project was finding the stencils in a font I liked. The stencils I used are the Plaid/FolkArt Peel & Stick Painting Stencils. They are a bit like the Colorforms I played with as kids, though a little stickier. They say they are reusable up to 20 cleanings. I was really happy with how well they stuck, even on the third one, and the sharp edges I was able to get.Both JoAnn and Michael’s carry them, but both had different fonts and designs.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses

Monogrammed Glasses

Supplies:

  • clean, dry glasses
  • ruler
  • non-permanent marker
  • peel & stick stencils
  • small paintbrush
  • etching cream (I used Martha Stewart’s.)

1. Use the ruler and marker to mark where you want the stencil on your glass. This is especially important if you are doing more than one glass and want them to look the same.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
2. Place the stencil on the glass. These stencils are a little stretch, so make sure to stick it on straight and not distorted. Press down all over with your finger, paying special attention to the edges of the letter.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
3. Use the small paintbrush to fill the stencil with etching cream. You really want to make sure it is on thick. Be careful not to getting etching cream anywhere else on the glass, you can wipe it off right away if you do.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
4. Let sit the amount of time your cream calls for, mine was 15 minutes.

5. Without removing the stencil, wash the bulk of the cream off the glass under warm water. Remove the stencil and wash the glass to remove any remaining cream.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
Clean and dry the stencil to use again and move on to the next glass.

My etching cream says the glasses will now be top rack safe in the dishwasher, though I bet the etching will last longer if they are washed by hand.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
I think these would be a fabulous gift. I’ll need to remember it for the future.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Kat’s 2016 in Crafts

At this time of year, just like everyone else, I like to look back at what I did throughout the year. For me that is a lot of crafts, especially knitting! Let’s take a look at my 2016 in crafts.
Crafts 2016
Starting from the top left…
1. Wooden Ball Candleholder – I love how this one turned out!
2. Birdwatching Mittens – For a friend in the UK.
3. Winter Snows Mittens – – Such a fun KAL!
4. Too Hot Coffee Sleeve
5. Little Sweater Girls – My tiny version of the Icelandic sweater.
6. Hang Dishtowel – No the most exciting project, but one we use everyday.
7. Cornwall Spring Mittens – Bunting!
8. Teeny Tiny Bunny Couple – One of my favorite projects of the year. I love making tiny things.
9. Tiny Knit Pig – An adaptation of the bunnies
10. Sharpie Painted Dishes
11. Yarn Ends Mittens – Using up all that leftover Palette for a Minnesota Knitters’ Guild Challenge.
12. Doctor Who Toile – Adding to the toile was so fun (and then I turned it into a project bag.)
13. More Drawstring Project Bags – These are in constant use.
14. Sarubobo – These make great pincushions.
15. Mini Mittens – I made about 40 of these this year to give everyone at my Project 365 house party in the UK.
16. Tiny,Knit Retro Swimsuit – A test for a bigger project you may see this spring.
17. Souvenir Hat – Using a pompom I bought on a trip to Germany and the handspun I bought in England.
18. Plaid Christmas Tree Skir
19. Arigurumi – My first attempt at crochet arigurumi
20. Go Blue Bear – My second attempt
21. Papercut Halloween Candle Covers
22. Pride and Prejudice Mittens – One of this year’s fair entries.
23. 12 Days of Christmas Mitten Garland – This KAL took half the year, but it was such fun.
24. MN Nice Mittens – A patten I design for a Minnesota Knitters’ Guild KAL next month.

I also took two ribbons at the MN State Fair this year, hosted two knit alongs and a design along, and had a project publish in the French book, Réinventer Lego.

In 2017, I want to continue to design more knitting patterns and I have at least two more knit alongs ready to go. I hope to have a pattern in at least one book and plan to try getting accepted to more things. I want to go back and clean up some of my older patterns to get them to a better standard. I also really want to knit myself a sweater, I say this every year, but this year I am really going to try! What are your craft goals for 2017?

 

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 24 – Pine Cone Trees

For this Iron Craft challenge we were asked to make something shiny and/or bright. Over Thanksgiving my mother-in-law, Kathee, and I were looking at projects you could do with used K-cups. One idea was to use them as planters for pine cone trees. I really liked the look, but didn’t have K-cups. What I did have was small plastic planters from the dollar store which were just the right size.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees
I think they look very sweet with my paper lantern village. (I little set I picked up at Target this year.) You can’t really see in the picture how the glitter sparkles when it’s dry.

You want to look for pine cones for this project that are big enough to either sit securely in your pots or will stand on top of them. I also recommend looking for some that are open, so you have places to put the glitter “snow.” (If you are picking pine cones up outside, bake them at a low temperature for a bit to kill any creepy crawly and dry up any sap.)

You can use any type of glitter you want for this or even some snow-tex. I used clear glitter, but it still dried pretty white.

Pine Cone Trees

Supplies

  • small pots
  • silver or other color acrylic paint (optional)
  • small paint brush
  • pine cones
  • white or clear glitter, glitter glue, glitter paint or snow-tex
  • clear glue, I used Elmer’s (if using plain glitter)

1. Paint your pots if you choose. Mine were plastic and took about three coats.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees

2. Pick pine cones that either sit in your pots or can be glued sitting on top of them. Mine sat securely in the pots, so I did not need to glue them in place. You can use the clear glue to glue them in place.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees
I chose to do this before adding the glitter, because it was nice to have the pine cones standing to work with them.

3. If you are using plain glitter, not a glitter paint or glue, mix it with some clear glue. I also added just a little water. You want it to be thick like a wet sand.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees

4. Use the small paint brush to mound the glitter on the tips of the pine cone “branches.” You want it to be like little piles of snow on the end of each one.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees

Let dry completely and display.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 23 – Washi Tape Deer

So, for this Iron Craft challenge we were to make something for the holidays. It could be a decoration or a gift. I did make two Christmas stockings for charity during that time, but I also decided to make an ornament.

Matt and I saw an ornament a L.L. Bean that looked like a dear with its body wrapped in strips of plaid fabric. I thought it was cute and Matt said, “You could make that and use washi tape instead of fabric.” So of course, I had to try it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
Yeah, it is ok, but I’m not thrilled with the results. I like the idea of the deer in plaid long johns, but the tape just doesn’t look smooth enough to me. Maybe a coat of some sort of sealer will help.

If you are interested in giving something similar a try, it certainly wasn’t hard or time consuming.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
I picked up the plastic deer and washi tape at Target. (They have holiday washi tape with the wrapping paper.) The screw eye was in my stash.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
I started covering the deer’s legs with small pieces of tape, just enough to go around and overlap. I tried using on long piece and go around and up, but I got too many folds.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
Then I filled in the tighter spaces. Finally, I just covered the rest of the body with bigger pieces and put the screw eye in.

I do really like this washi tape and might try to cover something with a less difficult shape with it.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

96 Christmas Ornaments to Make

Looking for a way to keep everyone busy over the long holiday weekend? Why not have a ornament making party. We have a lot of tutorials from easy to more challenging. Many you can make with things you already have around the house. Seriously, who wouldn’t have a good time crafting their own Pooping Log ornament!
acp15mosaic
Row 1 – Cross Stitched Locket, Drawer Knob Mushrooms, Jute Heart, Burlap Owl
Row 2 – Wooden Words, Jute Snowflake, Wrapped Wire Wreath, Jute Tree
Row 3 – Snowflake Fairy Peg Doll, Wooly Sheep, Birdhouse, Cross Stitched Wood Slice
Row 4 – Knit Robot, Jute and Pearl Ball, Hedgehog, State Map
Row 5 – Felt Elf, Two Hearts, Tiny Wooden Toboggan, Salt Dough Gingerbread Man
Row 6 – Plaid Star , Tiny Wooden Sled, Textured “Antique” Silver Star, Fur-Covered Ornaments
ACP14mosaic
Row 1 – Tiny Knit BearFelt Gingerbread House,  Mid Century Modern StarburstWooden Tree 
Row 2 – Shooting StarPeg Doll Elves (and a bonus Mr. Spock)Acorn StarGlitter Initial 
Row 3 – Rustic Angel Peg DollKnit Snow Owl3D Crocheted SnowflakeKnit Scalloped Tree 
Row 4 – Wooden StarSkiing SantaPeg Doll PenguinBurlap and Berries Christmas Ball
Row 5 – Snowflake Button WreathGlitter LightbulbTiny Felted DeerOctopus Topped Christmas Ball
Row 6 – Recycled Sweater Santa“Antique Silver” IciclePinecone ElfSnow Bird Ornament
AdventCalendar13
Ornaments inspired by Christmas around the world.
Row 1 –  Mexico – Tin Bird, China – Paper Lantern, UK – Victorian Cone , Iceland – Laufabrauð
Row 2 – Denmark – Papercut 3-D Angel, Ukraine – Spiderweb, Armenia – Dove Wreath , Hungary – Cut Felt Star
Row 3 – Germany – Felt Apple, Sweden – Santa Lucia and Star Boy, Australia – Glittered Shell, Latvia – Burlap Rose
Row 4 – Ireland – Holly Wreath, Russia – “Faberge” Egg, Finland – Straw Star, France – Felt Fish
Row 5 – Norway – Cut Heart, Spain – Pooping Log, Czech Republic – Golden Pig, Poland – Jeżyk
Row 6 –  Austria – Krampus, Philippines – Paper Paról, Japan – Origami Swan, USA – Knit Elf
adventcalendarproject2012
Row 1 – Willow Wreath Frame, Wooden Star, Felt Rocking Horse, Mini Mittens
Row 2 – Snow Covered Initial, Little Snow People, Paper Globe, Knit Candy Cane
Row 3 – Pom Pom Santa, Patterned Reindeer, Little Wooden Santa, Paper Circle
Row 4 – Mini Snowman, Wooden Angel, Button Initial, Glitter Bird
Row 5 – Tiny Togues, 3D Snowflake, Jeweled Trees, Tiny Sweater
Row 6 – Burlap and Button Heart, Felt Owl, Snowball, Felt Gnome

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 22 – Icicle Cowl

Boy, the letter “I” was a hard challenge! I finally decided my “I” was going to be “ice” or “icicle,” but I didn’t know what I was going to do with that. It got down to this weekend when I was working at Vogue Knitting Live and found a beautiful silk/cashmere beaded yarn. The silver lined beads on the creamy yarn really made me think of ice. With only 200 yards of yarn, I need to find just the right project. I thought a lace cowl was the way to go.

I knit all day yesterday and am about half done.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 22 - Icicle Cowl
The pattern, Lace Cowl, is free from Wendy Dayus. It is a simple six row repeat, which I had memorized after knitting it once. I think it works really well with the yarn. The cowl is so soft with a nice drape and the beads just catch the light, like ice!
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 22 - Icicle Cowl
You can see the beads a little better in this close up. It took be a bit to figure out how to make sure the beads are in the front, but I’ve got it down now. This is such a quick knit, I’ll probably have it done before the new president is declared tonight.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 21 – Spooky Papercut Candle Covers

With Halloween next week, the current Iron Craft challenge was to make something creepy, spooky, or scary. I channeled iron crafter Dr. Russ and made papercut haunted village and graveyard candle covers.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
I love doing things like this for different holidays because it isn’t permanent, so I can cover the glass candle holders with something else for the next holiday. Also once you own the candle holders all you need to buy is a piece of 12″ x 12″ cardstock which costs about $1, most of the other supplies will probably already be in your craft room. I chose to use cardstock because it is stiff enough to stand up straight.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
It also isn’t very hard to do, especially since haunted villages and creepy graveyards don’t require straight lines. Actually, crooked lines look best.

Spooky Papercut Candle Covers

Supplies:

  • glass candle holders with straight sides, flared sides will be much harder to fit a design around. My holders were 11″ around by 7″ and 4″ tall.(I found all different sizes of these at the dollar store.)
  • black cardstock (I used one sheet of 12″ x 12″ cardstock from the scrapbooking section and used it to cover both candles. The amount you need to depend on the size candle holders you use.)
  • measuring tape (optional)
  • pencil
  • ruler
  • exacto knife
  • cutting mat
  • paper scissors
  • glue
  • glue stick (optional)

1. Measure around your candle. You can do this with a measuring tape or just wrap the paper around and mark it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
Draw a line making the width, so you know how long your image can be.

2. On the back of the cardstock draw out your image with the pencil.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
I looked at images online to give me some ideas and then just went ahead and freehanded it. When you are doing the design remember that it need to overlap at the ends about 1/4″ at least at the bottom so you can make a circle to go around the candle. (If you are covering a candle that is bigger around, you may need to piece a couple papercuts together.)

3. Using the exacto knife and scissors cut out the image. On the haunted village, I used the knife to do the windows and scissors for the outside.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
You can see the tab I left at the bottom to glue it together. There is no windows on the opposite side at that point so the tab will be hidden inside.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
The village was really simple to do, while the graveyard took a little more concentration to make sure I was cutting out the correct pieces, especially with the fence. I used the exacto knife for this whole piece.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
On this one, the bottom of the tree overlaps right up to the edge of the opening of the fence on the other side.

4. Glue into a ring that fits around your candle holder and slip on.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
The papercut will not cling around the edge of the glass especially at the roof eaves and the tree branches. You can leave this like it is or you can tack the parts the stick out down. I tried a couple different things and the one that held things down best was glue stick. If you smear some glue on your candle and wipes off easily with a damp paper towel.

5. Put a candle inside. With the village candle I found it looked best with a shorter candle than I would normally put in the holder. This lit up a lot more of the windows.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Stitch Lab Updates: Candy Corn Sachet

Here is a quick little project that one of the student’s in the Stitch Lab created. Its a Candy Corn Sachet. Voila!

IMG_3647
The inspiration and the basis for the pattern are found on Chico and Jo right here. Here is how their’s looks:
candy_corn_felt_sachets_24-500x333

And here is ours:
IMG_3649

We crafted ours following the directions for the pattern as shown. But we made it out of fleece instead of felt. So our seam allowances are different, and the seams are different. So our finished sachet is smaller than the one on the web.
This was a great project for a beginner sewer. Fun, easy, and satisfying results.
Happy stitching!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Zarina Wings. Bail.

I started making Fairy Wings. And I got stuck. I pushed a little bit more, and got stuck again. I looked a YouTube and read tutorials about how some AMAZING wings were created. But, alas, mine still sat 1/2 done. Yesterday, after weeks of thinking and having them out and looking at them… I called “game” and went to Spirit Halloween store.

Surprise! When I walked in I was blown away by how clever some of the stuff in there was. It was so fun. There was a whole WALL of Fairy wings in the back of the store.
IMG_6476
Wow. How fun! So I took notes, and left, and brought my daughter back to the store after school. I had these thoughts that I could make super big wings with a specific pattern in the wire. And at the end of the day, it was better to just buy them.

Let me offer a few “don’ts” so that you do not have to struggle. My goal was to make really big really realistic fairy wings. I wanted them to look just like the wings in the Tinkerbell movies.
I wanted to have a lot of control in the bendability of the wire so I used a thick gauge floral wire. That turned out to be flexible enough to bend, but not stiff enough to really hold the shape.
IMG_5950
(Here in this picture is the wire I used, and a coat hanger as a contrast.)
Here are the wings in process. The curls that we made don’t actually provide extra stability. They do the opposite, the pull on the wings, adding weight and pending the tips out of shape.
IMG_6502
I tried using glue to stick the fabric to the wire frames. First up was E6000. This can be messy, but it is strong and it’s the glue of choice for beading.  In this case, it was messy, and it did not really hold. It would smoosh into the wrong places, and was hard to aim and spread on the wire only. Next I tried a glue gun. This too was VERY difficult to get to the right place. Where it did hold, it held well. Where it missed, the fabric let go of the wire in a super obvious way.

I kept looking at it, and thinking I was procrastinating. In fact, this was not working. And I was not getting what I wanted or needed. So I reluctantly scrapped the whole thing.
IMG_6500
Here is what she picked. (next to the old trials for contrast.)
They are big enough. And if blue is what she wants then blue it shall be.

Good luck to you with all of your store bought and home made creations!!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2015 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish