96 Christmas Ornaments to Make

Looking for a way to keep everyone busy over the long holiday weekend? Why not have a ornament making party. We have a lot of tutorials from easy to more challenging. Many you can make with things you already have around the house. Seriously, who wouldn’t have a good time crafting their own Pooping Log ornament!
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Row 1 – Cross Stitched Locket, Drawer Knob Mushrooms, Jute Heart, Burlap Owl
Row 2 – Wooden Words, Jute Snowflake, Wrapped Wire Wreath, Jute Tree
Row 3 – Snowflake Fairy Peg Doll, Wooly Sheep, Birdhouse, Cross Stitched Wood Slice
Row 4 – Knit Robot, Jute and Pearl Ball, Hedgehog, State Map
Row 5 – Felt Elf, Two Hearts, Tiny Wooden Toboggan, Salt Dough Gingerbread Man
Row 6 – Plaid Star , Tiny Wooden Sled, Textured “Antique” Silver Star, Fur-Covered Ornaments
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Row 1 – Tiny Knit BearFelt Gingerbread House,  Mid Century Modern StarburstWooden Tree 
Row 2 – Shooting StarPeg Doll Elves (and a bonus Mr. Spock)Acorn StarGlitter Initial 
Row 3 – Rustic Angel Peg DollKnit Snow Owl3D Crocheted SnowflakeKnit Scalloped Tree 
Row 4 – Wooden StarSkiing SantaPeg Doll PenguinBurlap and Berries Christmas Ball
Row 5 – Snowflake Button WreathGlitter LightbulbTiny Felted DeerOctopus Topped Christmas Ball
Row 6 – Recycled Sweater Santa“Antique Silver” IciclePinecone ElfSnow Bird Ornament
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Ornaments inspired by Christmas around the world.
Row 1 –  Mexico – Tin Bird, China – Paper Lantern, UK – Victorian Cone , Iceland – Laufabrauð
Row 2 – Denmark – Papercut 3-D Angel, Ukraine – Spiderweb, Armenia – Dove Wreath , Hungary – Cut Felt Star
Row 3 – Germany – Felt Apple, Sweden – Santa Lucia and Star Boy, Australia – Glittered Shell, Latvia – Burlap Rose
Row 4 – Ireland – Holly Wreath, Russia – “Faberge” Egg, Finland – Straw Star, France – Felt Fish
Row 5 – Norway – Cut Heart, Spain – Pooping Log, Czech Republic – Golden Pig, Poland – Jeżyk
Row 6 –  Austria – Krampus, Philippines – Paper Paról, Japan – Origami Swan, USA – Knit Elf
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Row 1 – Willow Wreath Frame, Wooden Star, Felt Rocking Horse, Mini Mittens
Row 2 – Snow Covered Initial, Little Snow People, Paper Globe, Knit Candy Cane
Row 3 – Pom Pom Santa, Patterned Reindeer, Little Wooden Santa, Paper Circle
Row 4 – Mini Snowman, Wooden Angel, Button Initial, Glitter Bird
Row 5 – Tiny Togues, 3D Snowflake, Jeweled Trees, Tiny Sweater
Row 6 – Burlap and Button Heart, Felt Owl, Snowball, Felt Gnome

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Stitch Lab Updates: Candy Corn Sachet

Here is a quick little project that one of the student’s in the Stitch Lab created. Its a Candy Corn Sachet. Voila!

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The inspiration and the basis for the pattern are found on Chico and Jo right here. Here is how their’s looks:
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And here is ours:
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We crafted ours following the directions for the pattern as shown. But we made it out of fleece instead of felt. So our seam allowances are different, and the seams are different. So our finished sachet is smaller than the one on the web.
This was a great project for a beginner sewer. Fun, easy, and satisfying results.
Happy stitching!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Road to the State Fair ’16: Finally Done!

I’ve done it, I have finally finished these friggin’ mittens for the Minnesota State Fair (with days to spare to submit them).
Pride and Predjudice Mittens
Don’t get me wrong, I love the pattern I came up with, I love the yarn and I love the finished mittens. I just struggled with knitting them for some reason.
Pride and Predjudice Mittens
I wanted to use this beautiful dark blue/green because it is a very peacock-like color, but at a gauge of fifteen stitches per inch I had a really hard time seeing the separate stitches and kept dropping them. I spent a lot of time in my reading glasses picking up stitches that had fallen four or five rows back. I finally finished both hands and then it took me three tries to get a thumb design that I liked the look of. This meant lots of tinking back tiny, tiny stitches. I finished the first thumb, picked up the stitches for the second and realized that I had made two right mittens! At this point I almost gave up thinking there was no way I could finish on time.
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But I didn’t give up. I frogged back to thumb, moved it and reknit the whole top of the mitten. So now, they are still drying from a blocking. I’ll probably also steam them and manually tighten a few loose stitches before bringing them in for judging.

I have to say, I have never been so happy to finish a pair of mittens, ever. I am working on getting this pattern together to share, so look for it later in August.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Project: Poodle Skirt

The girls of the Stitch Lab were asked to help make some poodle skirts for a 50’s musical performance at school. Of course we jumped on the chance. We had one as a “master” and we just used that one to create the general idea. This turned into a fun project for the girls, and after we made one, we made some more.
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Here is how we did it.

Poodle Skirt

Supplies

  • felt (2.25 yards of 72″ wide) Pink or light blue are traditional. Felt is sold (at least at JoAnns) on a bolt and it’s 72 inches wide.
  • poodle applique
  • sequin trim (or nice cord or braid for the leash detail)
  • wide black elastic for the waist.

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Directions:
You will need two measurements:
1. The waist measurement (measure where the skirt will sit. Here is the trick: “the kids these days” like to wear their skirts and their pants low around their hips. But the poodle skirt was never worn that way. It loses a little bit of the 50’s aesthetic if it rides low like that. If you can help to get that point across, and help them to wear the skirt at the smallest part of their waist, it will have a more authentic effect.) Measure the waist (or where they want to wear the skirt)
2. Measure the widest point on their body that the skirt will have to ride over. Be that the bum area or the hips, measure that. That will (probably) be a bigger number than the waist.

Fold the fabric in 1/2 (the way it came off the bolt), and then in 1/2 again.  Draw a gentle curve at the top corner.
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From this gentle curve, take a fabric tape measure, and measure down the shortest side.
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Using the tape measure and acting like it is a compass, hold one end on the opening, and move slowly around the bottom, creating an even arc using the tape measure and a fabric marking pen.
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This curve you are drawing will be the bottom edge of the skirt. Felt does not need to be hemmed, so make sure that your cut is smooth.

Cut the black elastic about 1 inch larger than the waist measurement. Sew the elastic closed (right sides together) at a place that is about 1 inch smaller than the waist measurement.

To fit the waist band into the felt skirt you will need to make some graceful gathers. You can do that by carefully stretching the elastic while you sew. (If this is very uncomfortable for you, just go old school and use a needle and thread and run a baste line around the top of the waist and make the gathers before you start.)

Using a chalk or disappearing ink, mark the skirt waist front, back, and two sides. This is easy to do by folding the felt, and just making small dots. Now, make the same markings on the black elastic.(or use one color pin at a marker if you do not have chalk that will show up on black elastic) Using the seam in the elastic as the center back, fold the waist band in half and mark the front. Then fold the elastic in half so that the front middle pin marker is on the back seam, and mark the two sides. Now you have a pin at the middle of the front of the elastic, at the “belly button” and one pin on each “hip” and then the back seam. So you have marked equal quarters around the circle.
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Match the pins to the markings on the felt. There will be 4-6 inches of ease that needs to be gently gathered when the elastic is being sewn. (Because it is felt, I did not turn it under.) I recommend just laying the black on top of the felt and pinning it in place. I used wide elastic and pinned about 1.5 inches up.

The poodle is an iron on patch, but we did not want to risk burning the felt, so we stitched it on. First, we hand basted the patch in place, and then ran the machine very close to the satin stitch trim all around the edge. (the girls did this themselves and were very successful with it.) Lower (or disengage) the feed dogs on your machine and then pull/feed the fabric around the outline of the patch carefully by hand.
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The last step is the fun sequin leash. At first glance it looks like you could just thread up a needle and run it right through the hole in the sequin that is there already. But this proved to be very tricky. We found that if we used black thread that we could take very small stitches at the base of a sequin, loop the thread around and go out the back almost where you went in, then tighten that stitch carefully, catching the base threads that are holding the sequin chain in place.
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In this way, you are tacking down the “spine” that holds the sequin string, and the thread does not show at all. Move up about 3 sequins and repeat the process.

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This project is a good one for kids. They end up with something to wear without a lot of “fine finishing” to do. “Happy Days” to you!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Project: American Girl Doll Mermaid Tail Snugglie

My daughter got an American Girl Doll (equivalent) for her birthday. She is LOVING it.

One of the most popular things in our house (and, on the blog) is her mermaid tail snugglie. So I thought I should whip one up for the new doll too. It was quick and easy and a BIG hit – so here is the pattern.
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Here is a neat fact – this mermaid tail can be made out of the scraps from cutting out the full size tail. So if you buy the fabric for the “big” tail, you can do both!

American Girl Doll Mermaid Tail

Supplies:

  • fleece (Two pieces 21″- 17″ or one piece 42″ x 34″)
  • matching thread
  • paper to draw pattern (an opened up brown paper grocery bag would work)

Directions:
Draw your pattern on the paper.

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Pattern note: the tail shape is pretty wide all the way down because the doll’s feet are flexed and they will need room to be in the tail, even at the “thin” part. Here are the measurements written out on the pattern.
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Take two pieces of fleece and lay them down together, (or fold the one piece in half), place the pattern on top, and cut it out.
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With right sides together (if there is a right side) sew the edges.

I used 1/2 inch seam allowance. Around the top opening, turn under about 1″ as a hem.

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Turn the tail right side out, and push the corners of the tail out to “sharp points”. I gave mine a quick steam so the tail part had a more pronounced shape.
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I hope that your tail is successful and met with the same joy!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Teaching Kids to Sew

I have an AMAZING job. I teach sewing as an elective at the middle school. The kids in class are 10 – 13 years old. I have refined my teaching style and my delivery to match my audience. While my class is “formal”, and I do require focus, it is an elective, and all the kids are really excited to be in the class. Some of them are so excited that they can’t help themselves. And I find that charming. When I think that there is still so much love and energy “for good” flowing through their veins I can’t help but drink that in and meet it “in kind”.
For our lesson here today I want to pass along how to teach the mechanics of sewing. This is what I talk about the first few classes.
Stitch Lab
First and foremost I teach safety. They don’t need to fear the machine, but they need to understand it. If they KNOW how it could hurt them, and then they know how to avoid the pitfalls. I have written on the board the first day:
The needle is sharp.
Pins are sharp.
Scissors are VERY sharp, and have blades.
The seam ripper is pointy AND sharp in two different places. Beware.
Irons get HOT.
The stools twirl. (no joke, kids have gotten to twirling on the stools and fallen off. So far, it has (only) been funny, but there is potential for injury there too, so I do mention it.)
The machines moves quickly.

We talk through all of these dangers. Needles and pins do not need much explanation. “Consider yourself warned”. Scissors deserve a little more time. We have “fabric scissors” and “craft scissors”, and the twain shall never meet. : ) The fabric scissors are very sharp. I teach how to pass scissors to another person so there is no danger. And the fabric scissors in our class are kept in their own plastic blade covers.
Seam rippers are a necessary tool, unfortunately. There is no “shame” in seam ripping, only lessons. But I talk about it before they need to use it, so that there is no “shame” implied when they are sent to do the ripping. I explain this using my hand to demonstrate. “Act like my hand is the seam ripper.” (I point my finger up, and hold out my hand like an “L”.) “The point is sharp – you can SEE that. But the other sharp part is here…” (Point to the inside curve of between your thumb and your index finger) “This will cut the threads. And that is the GOOD news. The bad news is that will cut the fabric too. And that is going to be a project wrecker. The worse news is that if your run that into your flesh, it will cut you. So you will use this tool away from your friends, and with a quiet concentration and lazar focus. And NOT is a twirly chair”. They can tell from the look on my face that I am not kidding around.
We talk about the iron together. And, can I just say, for a lot of my girls, this is the first time they have ironed. (WOW. There are some houses that do not even have an iron in the house. ) I heat up the iron and I hold it in front of them. I assure them that the plastic does not get burning hot, only the face plate. Then I actually iron in front of them. And for many of them, this is the first time they have seen anyone ironing. Here is an important teaching moment for me. “I will teach you how to iron. Some people find it a very peaceful tranquil activity. And some people find it a chore. I will teach you how to do it, and I will require you to iron the seams of some of your projects. And then, you will go on, and grow up and be amazing and successful in your own right, and then you will CHOOSE whether you find ironing peaceful, and you do it yourself, or you find it a chore, and you will pay someone else to iron for you. Either way, I will salute your choice. ” I don’t feel anyone is “above ironing” or “beneath ironing”, its just a choice.

When it is time for them to sit down and SEW I teach them how to thread the machine and the bobbin. There are numbers on our machines at different points so they can just follow the numbers. And they can ALWAYS ask for help. When it came time to sew I figured out that many of them did not know how to use the pedal. On the tip of my tongue were the words “Honey, it’s just like DRIVING!” and then, whoa, an 11 year old has never driven a car. Their driving experience is limited to a bumper car ride or the Autotopia at Disneyland! They. Have. Never. Driven. A. Car. (oh bless their little hearts. There is one area of “grown up” technology that has not leeched it’s way down to our kiddies yet!) After some rocky staccato lurky-jerky sewing, I bent down and figured out that they literally do not know how to use a pedal. How would they know, they have never climbed into the front seat and watched anyone’s feet! I take the pedal off the machine, and (I am not kidding here) I sit on a chair on a table and show them how to press on a pedal. I was seeing all kinds of tip-toe action. I show them how to keep their heel ON THE FLOOR, and only push their toe down. I talk about using their foot as a lever. And about how the pedal is actually manual, it is not an ipad or touch screen. When they start sewing, we work on scrap paper first. I have them sew along the edge of the paper. Then I offer a cut piece of paper with a gentle curve, and have them maintain a consistent seam allowance with that. Once they have shown me some good results on paper, we add thread and fabric to the equation, and start on a real project.

I feel like this is enough information for them to handle, and gets them to the place where they can sew a basic project.
Happy sewing people. May all your days be filled with the unbridled enthusiasm of a kid in an elective.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2015 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Project: Dog Collar Bandana

Here is a great sewing project for you or a gift to the dog lovers in your life.
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It’s quick, easy, neat, washable, and uses scrap fabric! How great is that? Here is a bandana for your dog, but it does not need to be tied on, it fits right over the collar.

Dog Collar Bandana

Stitch Lab
Supplies:

  • two squares of fabric at least 9″ x 8″ each
  • thread

Pattern

Dog Collar Bandana Pattern
Here is a pattern to print out and use. The pattern shown is for a “medium” size dog. (20 – 30 lbs.) You could make it bigger for a bigger dog if you wanted to.
Cut the pattern out of two pieces of fabric. (They can be the same or contrasting.)
Sew the bottom (flat sides) together (right sides facing)
Iron the seam flat
Fold the straight side seams in and press down
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sew along the first 3 inches, 1/8″ from the edge (Here, you are just finishing off the edge where the collar is going to go through.)
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Fold the two sides, right sides together, and sew the ‘triangle’ parts together. (be sure not to sew the edges together all the way down, because you want to leave a hole for the collar to go through.)
Lastly, sew across the bottom of the triangle. This forms a tube area for the collar and the triangle rides off the collar as a decorative triangle.

Have fun. Make loads!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2015 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Project: Fall Leaf Votive Mason Jar

This post is part of a series of six “Crafty Kids” classes that I am teaching after school at the elementary school. I have projects that can be done in one hour by 1st-4th graders (5 – 9 years old). For this class, we did Fall Leaf Mason Jars.
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Fall Leaf Mason Jar

Supplies:

  • mason jar (Plastic or glass will work. With the number and ages of my kids, I used heavy plastic. I was glad when one hit the floor in class.)
  • votive candles (electric candles with plastic mason jars)
  • fall leaves
  • raffia “strings”
  • Mod Podge
  • sponge brushes
  • rubber bands

Directions:
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Here are the leaves and the candles that we used. The leaves are fabric with printing on them and texture stamped into them. They did not fray or lose color. They also did not lose their texture. I’m not sure if that is a good thing or a bad thing. I tried to wet them and iron them first just to see if I could get them to “relax” a little bit and make them adhere to the jar a little bit better. I had no luck. These little beauties are, in fact, industrial strength.

Using the foam brushes, apply mod podge to the surface of the jar. It is easier to do this with your hand IN the jar to hold it.

Quickly, carefully put the leaves on the Mod Podge surface. Take the rubber bands and put them on all around to hold the leaves down. (This is best done with a friend. One hand in the jar, one hand holding the leaves in place so that they don’t peel back or flop away, then a friend using two hands to open up the rubber band and get it around and on the jar without scraping the leaves off in the process.)

Apply a “top coat” of Mod Podge to the leaves to help glue them down.
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Here, we are in THICK, even dripping, Mod Podge mess territory. Fear not, it dries clear and shiny
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Here is our mason jar, dried and glowing.
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To finish it off, remove the rubber bands. Take the raffia and tie a bow (or just a knot) around the neck of the jar. For night time, insert (drop) the candle into the bottom. I have to say, they really have quite a charm to them.
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Have fun! Happy Fall.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2015 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

 

Perspective in Creation

I am working on some fairy wings for Halloween. I would love to make a sturdy, large, light, etherial pair of wings. I have these exact specs in my mind’s eye. “They have to look exactly THIS way,” says my inner editorial voice.
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(This picture is days earlier when I was sketching the wing outline. She helped.)

I had a sketch on some newsprint on the floor and all the supplies collected are around me. The truth is that I was sitting with very little happening. “How am I going to make this WORK?” My daughter came into the room, looked at the scene and said, “OOOOoooo! Can I help?!” The editorial creative director in my head screamed possessively and was silenced immediately by the Mother-voice, “Yes, of course you can Love.” Then she asked, “What are you doing?” (Shouldn’t the questions have been in the other order? “What are you doing?” and THEN, “Can I help?” after she has decided that it looks fun enough to join? )

She picked up a floral wire and said, “Can I try?” Once again, there was a whole dialogue in my head, but “Sure. Careful near your eyes with the wire.” came cheerfully out of my mouth.  She bent the wire around her hand and adjusted it. Then she set the wire twirl into the wing template that was sketched. She looked at her contribution and said, “There!” “Like that Mom?” I looked at it, looked up at her and broke into a grin. “That is fantastic!” And it was. The executive Creative Director in my head was silenced. The Kid had picked up some wire and just made something without the fight. She didn’t bring a whole cast of characters in her head to the project. Her inner critic is there, but it has so little strength. How liberating! How beautiful! Lesson: Shut the critic up and just try your project. Try to set the picture in your mind’s eye to one side, and just look at the supplies you have chosen and make something. Craft like you are 6!!!!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2015 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Painting Pottery

We walked by the paint your own pottery shop one day and ended up inside. It was a magical spontaneous afternoon activity. My girl stuck with it for a REALLY long time, so that made the cost of “studio time” worth the money.
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I wanted to break it down a little bit, so that you have all the tricks.

I went with an artistic five-year old. She was eager and ready, in fact, it was her suggestion. I found out later that they had brought a mobile set up to the school! So, when she saw the storefront, she knew exactly what was going on.
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You could bring a younger kid to work with you, they just might not last as long and the piece would be different.

Here is a basic run-down. First, you will choose what you would like to work on. They have everything from soup to nuts here. There are funny things, piggy banks, traditional mugs, goofy mugs, and even “fantasy” figures. They have every kind of plate, platter, pot, pitcher, and bowl imaginable from the very plain straight forward to the holiday ornate. You will pay by-the-piece and the charges will run anywhere from $2.50 – $48.00 depending on the size of the piece.

There is also a studio fee. For adults it was $9.75 and for kids $7.00. This is an all-day pass, so you don’t have to rush.
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I found the selection to be VAST and maybe a little bit overwhelming. If you plan to go, I would take a moment and organize your thoughts around what you want to accomplish. With little kids, are you just there to have a good time and sit with each other? Or do you need to create a certain amount of mugs in a set amount of time. You need to weigh the “process” vs. the “product” and hopefully you will enjoy both!
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My daughter is blissfully uninhibited. I have “an idea” that things will be neat and artistic and have a flair. Have a plan in your head about what you are shooting for – a chevron, or a stencil, or a reverse dot pattern… Pinterest is LOADED with ideas. The neatest thing that I saw with younger artists were pieces that featured their hand prints of foot prints. Here is Pottery We Love on Pinterest. Lots of good ideas!

You could go do pieces for Christmas/Chanukah, Valentines, birthdays, or what ever occasion you want. I would just caution you to go far enough ahead of time. Keep in mind that you make your piece, and then leave them to be fired. You come back several days later to pick them up.

Have you been to one of these places? Show us your creations!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.© 2005 – 2015 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish