Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 26 – Monogrammed Glasses

For this last Iron Craft challenge we could do whatever we wanted. I used it as a chance to do a project I’ve been wanting to do for awhile, monogramming some glasses with etching cream. Why did I wait so long do this? Well, it’s because the glasses I wanted to monogram are actually the jars our local grocery store’s mustard comes in and I had to wait for Matt to finish up the mustard!
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
This was such a simple project, but I love the finished look. They really don’t look like a DIY at all (or mustard jars for that matter). I have three done and am just waiting for the fourth one to be emptied.

The trickiest part of this project was finding the stencils in a font I liked. The stencils I used are the Plaid/FolkArt Peel & Stick Painting Stencils. They are a bit like the Colorforms I played with as kids, though a little stickier. They say they are reusable up to 20 cleanings. I was really happy with how well they stuck, even on the third one, and the sharp edges I was able to get.Both JoAnn and Michael’s carry them, but both had different fonts and designs.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses

Monogrammed Glasses

Supplies:

  • clean, dry glasses
  • ruler
  • non-permanent marker
  • peel & stick stencils
  • small paintbrush
  • etching cream (I used Martha Stewart’s.)

1. Use the ruler and marker to mark where you want the stencil on your glass. This is especially important if you are doing more than one glass and want them to look the same.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
2. Place the stencil on the glass. These stencils are a little stretch, so make sure to stick it on straight and not distorted. Press down all over with your finger, paying special attention to the edges of the letter.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
3. Use the small paintbrush to fill the stencil with etching cream. You really want to make sure it is on thick. Be careful not to getting etching cream anywhere else on the glass, you can wipe it off right away if you do.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
4. Let sit the amount of time your cream calls for, mine was 15 minutes.

5. Without removing the stencil, wash the bulk of the cream off the glass under warm water. Remove the stencil and wash the glass to remove any remaining cream.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
Clean and dry the stencil to use again and move on to the next glass.

My etching cream says the glasses will now be top rack safe in the dishwasher, though I bet the etching will last longer if they are washed by hand.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 26 - Monogramed Glasses
I think these would be a fabulous gift. I’ll need to remember it for the future.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 24 – Pine Cone Trees

For this Iron Craft challenge we were asked to make something shiny and/or bright. Over Thanksgiving my mother-in-law, Kathee, and I were looking at projects you could do with used K-cups. One idea was to use them as planters for pine cone trees. I really liked the look, but didn’t have K-cups. What I did have was small plastic planters from the dollar store which were just the right size.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees
I think they look very sweet with my paper lantern village. (I little set I picked up at Target this year.) You can’t really see in the picture how the glitter sparkles when it’s dry.

You want to look for pine cones for this project that are big enough to either sit securely in your pots or will stand on top of them. I also recommend looking for some that are open, so you have places to put the glitter “snow.” (If you are picking pine cones up outside, bake them at a low temperature for a bit to kill any creepy crawly and dry up any sap.)

You can use any type of glitter you want for this or even some snow-tex. I used clear glitter, but it still dried pretty white.

Pine Cone Trees

Supplies

  • small pots
  • silver or other color acrylic paint (optional)
  • small paint brush
  • pine cones
  • white or clear glitter, glitter glue, glitter paint or snow-tex
  • clear glue, I used Elmer’s (if using plain glitter)

1. Paint your pots if you choose. Mine were plastic and took about three coats.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees

2. Pick pine cones that either sit in your pots or can be glued sitting on top of them. Mine sat securely in the pots, so I did not need to glue them in place. You can use the clear glue to glue them in place.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees
I chose to do this before adding the glitter, because it was nice to have the pine cones standing to work with them.

3. If you are using plain glitter, not a glitter paint or glue, mix it with some clear glue. I also added just a little water. You want it to be thick like a wet sand.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees

4. Use the small paint brush to mound the glitter on the tips of the pine cone “branches.” You want it to be like little piles of snow on the end of each one.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees Iron Craft '16 Challenge 24 - Pine Cone Trees

Let dry completely and display.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 23 – Washi Tape Deer

So, for this Iron Craft challenge we were to make something for the holidays. It could be a decoration or a gift. I did make two Christmas stockings for charity during that time, but I also decided to make an ornament.

Matt and I saw an ornament a L.L. Bean that looked like a dear with its body wrapped in strips of plaid fabric. I thought it was cute and Matt said, “You could make that and use washi tape instead of fabric.” So of course, I had to try it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
Yeah, it is ok, but I’m not thrilled with the results. I like the idea of the deer in plaid long johns, but the tape just doesn’t look smooth enough to me. Maybe a coat of some sort of sealer will help.

If you are interested in giving something similar a try, it certainly wasn’t hard or time consuming.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
I picked up the plastic deer and washi tape at Target. (They have holiday washi tape with the wrapping paper.) The screw eye was in my stash.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
I started covering the deer’s legs with small pieces of tape, just enough to go around and overlap. I tried using on long piece and go around and up, but I got too many folds.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 23 - Washi Tape Deer
Then I filled in the tighter spaces. Finally, I just covered the rest of the body with bigger pieces and put the screw eye in.

I do really like this washi tape and might try to cover something with a less difficult shape with it.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 21 – Spooky Papercut Candle Covers

With Halloween next week, the current Iron Craft challenge was to make something creepy, spooky, or scary. I channeled iron crafter Dr. Russ and made papercut haunted village and graveyard candle covers.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
I love doing things like this for different holidays because it isn’t permanent, so I can cover the glass candle holders with something else for the next holiday. Also once you own the candle holders all you need to buy is a piece of 12″ x 12″ cardstock which costs about $1, most of the other supplies will probably already be in your craft room. I chose to use cardstock because it is stiff enough to stand up straight.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
It also isn’t very hard to do, especially since haunted villages and creepy graveyards don’t require straight lines. Actually, crooked lines look best.

Spooky Papercut Candle Covers

Supplies:

  • glass candle holders with straight sides, flared sides will be much harder to fit a design around. My holders were 11″ around by 7″ and 4″ tall.(I found all different sizes of these at the dollar store.)
  • black cardstock (I used one sheet of 12″ x 12″ cardstock from the scrapbooking section and used it to cover both candles. The amount you need to depend on the size candle holders you use.)
  • measuring tape (optional)
  • pencil
  • ruler
  • exacto knife
  • cutting mat
  • paper scissors
  • glue
  • glue stick (optional)

1. Measure around your candle. You can do this with a measuring tape or just wrap the paper around and mark it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
Draw a line making the width, so you know how long your image can be.

2. On the back of the cardstock draw out your image with the pencil.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
I looked at images online to give me some ideas and then just went ahead and freehanded it. When you are doing the design remember that it need to overlap at the ends about 1/4″ at least at the bottom so you can make a circle to go around the candle. (If you are covering a candle that is bigger around, you may need to piece a couple papercuts together.)

3. Using the exacto knife and scissors cut out the image. On the haunted village, I used the knife to do the windows and scissors for the outside.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
You can see the tab I left at the bottom to glue it together. There is no windows on the opposite side at that point so the tab will be hidden inside.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
The village was really simple to do, while the graveyard took a little more concentration to make sure I was cutting out the correct pieces, especially with the fence. I used the exacto knife for this whole piece.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
On this one, the bottom of the tree overlaps right up to the edge of the opening of the fence on the other side.

4. Glue into a ring that fits around your candle holder and slip on.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 21  - Spooky Papercut Candle Covers
The papercut will not cling around the edge of the glass especially at the roof eaves and the tree branches. You can leave this like it is or you can tack the parts the stick out down. I tried a couple different things and the one that held things down best was glue stick. If you smear some glue on your candle and wipes off easily with a damp paper towel.

5. Put a candle inside. With the village candle I found it looked best with a shorter candle than I would normally put in the holder. This lit up a lot more of the windows.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge #15 – Glue Snowflakes

For this Iron Craft challenge, we were supposed to use the word “cool” as our prompt. Well, what could be cooler than snowflakes? Over the past couple of years, I have been intrigued by the snowflake ornaments made from hot glue. Some of them really looked spectacular so I wanted to give it a try. While I was pulling out my hot glue, I decided to try making them with a few different glues, so let’s call this the glue snowflake tests.

I started out by printing a sheet of simple snowflake patterns about 2.5″ each. I put a sheet of wax paper on top of these snowflakes wax side up and taped them together so I wouldn’t get movement. Then I “drew” the snowflakes with the different glues on top of the wax paper. I used a toothpick to clean up any mistakes on all the snowflakes.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes
First, I tried glitter glue that I picked up in the dollar store. The glue had a gel consistency, but wasn’t so thick that it was hard to get out of the bottle. I really liked how this glue worked for drawing, it didn’t spread and the pointed tip made it easy to draw lines.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes
Second, I tried Tacky Glue. It was hard to draw nicely with this because it tended to get strings between the drawing and the bottle. It also spread more and more as it dried. Because it didn’t dry right away, I sprinkled some white glitter on it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes
Lastly, I went with hot glue, which was what I had seen done before. I found it really hard to get consistent width lines with the hot glue. Surprisingly though, strings were less of a problem then with the Tacky Glue. The hot glue dries very fast which makes it hard to get glitter to stick.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes
And now for the results after drying overnight.
The glitter gel was the one I had the most hope for, but it dried completely flat. I was able to gently peel it from the wax paper, but would never have gotten a whole one off in one piece and it wouldn’t hold its shape.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes
The Tacky Glue was the most successful. It easily pulled from the wax paper and holds its shape. It is still quite bendy though and I wouldn’t hang it as an ornament.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes
The hot glue, which was supposed to be the version that made beautiful snowflakes according to Pinterest, was a mess. It completely stuck to the wax paper. I imagine the heat melted the wax a little. It is also quite bendy.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #15 - Glue Snowflakes

All and all, I would call this one an Iron Craft fail!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge 8 – Doctor Who Toile

This was an interesting challenge, we were asked to make a project that contains something unexpected. I’d been wanting to play with adding things to classic toile fabric for awhile so this was a good opportunity for this.

My plan was to embroidery things from Doctor Who into the pastoral scenes on the fabric. It was a little tricky to find the fabric as the ladies at Joann didn’t know what toile was! Finally, I showed them a picture and they found it in black and white and blue and white in the upholstery section.
IMG_5122
When I sat down to draw my pattern onto the fabric, I realized I didn’t want to do embroidery because it would stand out too much. I wanted to do something that made the things I was adding look like they were part of the original fabric.

What I ended up with was simply drawing the designs in with paint the same color as the printing. I think the effect is really great. Susi didn’t even notice I had added the Tardis when I first sent her this picture.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 8 - Doctor Who Toile
I also did a dalek, but I don’t think it was as successful as the Tardis.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 8 - Doctor Who Toile
Because the original print was so busy and close together, it was a little tricky to find good place to add my little extras. If you can find a toile that is a little more open, it would be even better for this. You can also buy Doctor Who toile already printed on Spoonflower.

Now that I have my fabric done I need to decide what I want to do with it. I’m thinking probably a throw pillow or perhaps framing the fabric to hang. Though I am also tempted to do a bag of some sort. What would you do?

Doctor Who Toile

You don’t have to do Doctor Who of course, you could add sea creatures or anything else.

Supplies:

  • toile
  • ruler
  • printed images you want to add (or you can freehand draw them)
  • scissors
  • straight pin
  • dressmakers tracing paper
  • ballpoint pen
  • fabric paint to match print(or acrylic paint if you don’t plan on washing the final product)
  • toothpicks

1. Figure out where you want to place your image in the pattern on the fabric. Measure to find out how big your image needs to be. Print or copy the image to the correct size. You’ll also want to pay attention to the direction it faces.

2. Cut the image out from the sheet of paper leaving enough white space around it to pin it in place. Pin where you want it on the fabric. Pinning it keeps it from moving around too much while you trace the image.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 8 - Doctor Who Toile
Slide the tracing paper between the image and the fabric, make sure the active side is facing the fabric.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 8 - Doctor Who Toile
3. Use a ballpoint pen (or anything else with a hard tip) to trace the image onto your fabric. You want to push hard enough to get the tracing medium on the fabric, but not so hard you cut through with the pen. I actually really like to do this with a pen that is out of ink, so there is no worry if I do break through. Remove the paper image and tracing paper.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 8 - Doctor Who Toile
4. Use the tip of a toothpick and fabric paint to draw over the image you traced on the fabric. I liked to use a toothpick rather that even a tiny brush because I could get better thin lines. Just put a little paint on the tip at a time. It is best to start light and build up the image. You want it to look as much like the print already on the fabric, so use that as your guide for shading and how solid lines should be.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 8 - Doctor Who Toile
Layering it so it looks like some of the plants and such are in front of your addition really makes it blend in.

5. Let the paint dry and follow any instructions for setting it. Usually, you need to press it with an iron.

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge #7 – Sharpie Painted Dishes

For the current Iron Craft challenge, we were to incorporate dots into a project. I bought some Sharpie paint pens awhile back and have been wanting to use them to decorate some cheap porcelain. This seemed like the perfect project for it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 7 - Sharpie Painted Dishes
I found these $1.99 square bowls at Target. They are the perfect size for a little snack and I have needed something like them. As you can tell, I just drew all my designs by hand, so my dots aren’t perfect. This was not my original plan.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 7 - Sharpie Painted Dishes
I actually spent a good hour and a half or so making stencils from masking tape and different sizes of hole punch. I covered a bowl and started filling in the stencils only to find out the paint pens bled right through the masking tape. So much for the best laid plans. Luckily, until you bake your pieces, the designs can easily be removed with rubbing alcohol.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 7 - Sharpie Painted Dishes
In the end, I do like the hand drawn ones, they have their own charm. I really like how the pens worked and the great shine the designs have on them. My only complaint is that even though my pens were a fine point, they lost the point pretty quickly during the first bowl. I would actually like something even finer. I have the pens and five colors and thinking I might try a few other accent pieces.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 7 - Sharpie Painted Dishes

Sharpie Painted Dishes

This is a super simple project and would be easy for kids to do to create custom pieces as well. The paint washes easily off your hands with alcohol.

Supplies:

  • porcelain dishes (you can find cheap ones at places like the dollar store, Target, World Market..)
  • Sharpie oil-based paint pens (make sure to get the oil and not water based)
  • rubbing alcohol or vodka (I used some alcohol wipes I had on hand.)
  • paper towels
  • scrap paper
  • baking sheet
  • oven

1. Wash and dry your dishes, removing all tags. Then clean again with a little rubbing alcohol. Let dry.

2. Draw your design on our dishes. If you make a mistake clean it off with the alcohol. Make sure to completely clean it as smudges will be permanent once you bake the dish.

3. Let dry for 3 days. Check to see if there are any smudges or things you want to clean up before baking.

4. Put the dishes on a baking sheet and put in a cold oven. Set the oven to 450F and the timer for 1 hour. When the hour is up, turn off the oven and leave the dishes inside to cool.

Now you have dishes you can eat off of and wash. I’m not sure if they will hold up in the dishwasher, but mine have stood hand washing just fine.

You can also use these marker on glasses.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Project: Custom Mitten Blockers

Recently, I’ve been wishing for mitten blockers. Usually, I just put my mittens between towels to block them, but it really doesn’t shape them as forcefully as I’d like. There are blockers for sale on Etsy, but I started thinking, “I knit custom fit mittens, shouldn’t my blockers be custom too?”

Some people in my Ravelry forms have talked about making blockers from cardboard wrapped in plastic wrap. It looked like it worked really well, but since I make so many pairs of mittens I wanted something a little more long lasting. I wanted them to be made with plastic to use over and over again.
Custom Mitten Blockers
They aren’t the prettiest things, but they work great!

The trick was finding the right plastic. I wanted something that wouldn’t just bend inside the mitten, but I needed to be able to cut it with utility scissors. The solution was flexible cutting boards.
Custom Mitten Blockers
I found the perfect ones at Target in a four pack for $9.99. Each board was big enough to do one set of blockers. These boards are flexible, but they aren’t the super thin ones that are almost placemats. They were just under 1/8″ thick and took a little hand strength to cut. They weren’t too far off from a cutting mat, but so much cheaper!

To use the blockers, put the thumb blocker in first and then the hand blocker. I decided to put them in dry mittens and then wet them since I thought it would be easier to get them in a dry mitten. Oops, I forgot that meant I couldn’t squeeze out the water!
Custom Mitten Blockers
Still, after bring pressed between a folded towel they are almost dry after a few hours.

These were so worth the $2.50 they cost me to make!

Custom Mitten Blockers

Supplies:

  • thin plastic cutting board
  • sharpie or other marker
  • ruler
  • utility scissors like kitchen shears
  • utility knife
  • cutting board to work on
  • sandpaper (optional)
  • lighter or candle (optional)

1. Use the marker and ruler to draw out the width, length and shape you want the final mitten to be.
Custom Mitten Blockers
I did mine just the length of the hand, but you could include the cuff too. Cut out.

Draw the thumb blockers the width, length and shape of the thumb. Cut out.
Custom Mitten Blockers
2. Round the bottom corners.
Custom Mitten Blockers
3. Cut holes in the blockers to help with drying. Leave at least 1/2″ between the sides and holes. I found it was easiest to cut a starter hole with the utility knife and then use the scissors.
Custom Mitten Blockers
4. (Optional) If your edges are really ragged you can sand then with some sandpaper or melt them with a lighter or candle (make sure you are in a well ventilated area). The edges don’t need to be perfectly smooth, just make sure you don’t have big sharp points sticking out that might grab your yarn.
Custom Mitten Blockers
5. Make sure to wash off any marker (and soot if you melted the edges) before using.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge #3 – Sweater Girls

For this challenge our prompt was G is for…. Well, G is for girls, sweater girls!

When I was in Iceland in December, my friend Lori found this artist, Heavenly Hosts, who carved these sweet little girls and boys in Lopi sweaters.
IMG_7988
We searched out the studio only to find out everything was sold out because it was three weeks until Christmas. Those little dolls have been stuck in my head. I thought about using them as an inspiration for painting up peg dolls. Then I though, “Why paint? I can knit up tiny, tiny sweaters.”

So, here is my version of the little Icelandic sweater girl.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
I wrote the pattern for the little sweater for a specific peg (pin) doll. It is Darice 9104-90 2″ Wood Doll Pin. You can get them at most craft stores and the site I linked to sells them for $0.87 for two.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls

Sweater Girl Peg Dolls

This is a project for someone who likes making little thing. The knitting is very tiny.

Supplies:

  • 2″ wooden peg doll
  • lace weight yarn in three colors, you just need scraps. I used Knit Picks Gloss, some random mohair and some crochet thread.
  • four size 0000 double pointed needles or size needed to get gauge
  • scissors
  • tapestry needle
  • acrylic paint, I used grey, pink and black
  • small paintbrush
  • toothpicks (optional)
  • hair color yarn or embroidery thread. I used Caron Simply Soft.
  • tacky glue
  • 6mm wooden bead
  • utility knife
  • small eye screw (if you want to make this into an ornament)

1. Knit up the sweater of your choice. Here is the pattern along with three different charts, Sweater Girl Pattern
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
Try the sweater on your doll. Use the tails on the sleeves to put them in place on either side. Take the sweater off and tie those tails off on the inside. The sleeves will not be very secure, but you just want to hold them in place until you glue them down. Trim the tails except for the bind off tail at the neck.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
(You can see I really need to trim the mohair!)
2. Paint base of the peg doll. Let dry.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
3. Paint on the mouth and eyes. I find a toothpick is the easiest way to do this. Let dry completely.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
4. Put the sweater back on. Use the bind off tail to tighten the neck is needed and pull the tail inside. Glue the sweater in place.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
Glue down the sleeve.
5. Add the hair. I used pieces of yarn that I untwisted into strands. Start with small pieces and glue on bangs. I find a toothpick helps move and separate strands.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
Now cut a bunch of pieces of yarn about 5″ long and untwist them into strands. Glue on to create the long hair. I experimented with different way but the best was to just glue the pieces with the center on the top of the head working my way back until the head was full. Make sure the pieces are close together.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
Braid the strands on either side of the head. I had 8 strands on each side, so I braided bunches of 3, 3, and 2. Glue the braid together as you go. This will keep it together and make the braid stick out when finished.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
Use another strand of yarn to tie the end of the braid shut. Put a little glue on the knot to hold it. Trim the ends of the braids.

6. Use the utility knife to cut the wooden bead into quarters. I found it cut really easily and I could actually even do it with scissors.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls
Glue a quarter at the bottom of each sleeve.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge #3 - Sweater Girls

7. If you want to make this into an ornament, screw a screw eye into the top of the head.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2016 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Iron Craft ’16 Challenge #1 – Wooden Ball Candleholder

This first Iron Craft project of 2016! For this challenge, we were told to use the gifts associated with a 5th anniversary, wood, silverware and daisies, as our inspiration. I was pretty sure I was going to use wood and then I remembered a candleholder I pinned on Pinterest made of wooden balls, it was a prefect time to try it.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
I’m so thrilled with how this turned out. It fits in really well with our modern Scandinavian decor. It was pretty easy to make, but took a lot more wooden balls than I ever thought. Luckily, I had bought 400 of them.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
Actually, finding the wooden balls was the hardest part. I checked all the local craft shops and they all had wooden beads, but nothing without a hols through it. (Even the employees were surprised.) That led me to the internet. I found the best resource, Craftparts.com. They offered the balls in twenty-once different sizes and grades for a great price. I got the 400 balls and even with shipping it was less than buying 100 of one size elsewhere. Plus I had my package in two days. This is a supply source I will remember.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
I kept my candleholder very simple. I used first grade balls and didn’t do anything to their finish at all. I really love the wood grain and natural color. You could easily, stain the balls or paint some or all of them. The version that inspired me had bits of greenery inserted in it which was lovely and I’ll remember for next Christmas.

Wooden Ball Candleholder

Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
Supplies:

  • extruded foam wreath form, this harder foam will except paint and not melt from the hot glue.
  • brown acrylic paint (optional)
  • paintbrush (optional)
  • wooden balls in assorted sizes (I used 100 1/4″, 100 1/2″, 80 3/4″ and 80 1″.)
  • hot glue gun
  • hot glue sticks
  • hairdryer (optional)
  • felt
  • scissors

1. (Optional step) If you are worried that the green of the wreath might show through at all, paint the top and side of it brown. Let dry.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
2. Put the wreath on a flat surface. Start gluing wooden balls around the outside bottom edge. I found it was easiest to put a little glue on the balls and then attach them to the wreath form rather than putting the glue on the wreath. I used a mixed of the 1″ and 3/4″ to to this, but you could as do just the 1″ if you can make it fit correctly all the way around.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
Do the same thing with the inside bottom edge. My wreath had just enough space for a pillar candle when I used the 1″ balls. You’ll want to make sure your candle will fit before gluing in the balls as well.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder

Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
3. Fill in as much of the wreath as you can with the two largest size balls. Don’t worry you will have open spaces that you will fill in later.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
4. Start layering in the smaller balls, filling in the open spaces. I added more 3/4″ and 1/2″ then just worked with the 1/2″ and 1/4″. Keep adding balls until you are happy with the shape of the wreath and have filled in any large spaces.
Iron Craft '16 Challenge 1 - Wooden Ball Candleholder
5. Once all the balls are glued securely on, you can use a hairdryer to melt off hot glue strings.

6. If you want to finish off the bottom and protect surfaces the candleholder may sit on, cut a circle of felt big enough to fit under the wreath yet small enough it doesn’t show. Glue in place.
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