Wee Winter Woolens KAL: Bonus Wee Polar Bear Sweater

Yes, this KAL was technically supposed to be over after the twelfth pattern, but I couldn’t resist sharing one more with you. A baker’s dozen is better than just twelve right?! So, here is one more wee sweater for you, the wee polar bear sweater.

This one was my husband’s idea and I just think it is so cute. As a matter of fact, I liked it so much, that I am working on patterns for a set of wee sweaters with animals on them, look for that coming sometime next year.

I knit this sweater with the polar bear just on the front, stranding the white yarn all the way around. If you don’t want to carry the yarn that much, you could knit him on the front and back or duplicate stitch him on afterwards.

Download the Wee Polar Bear Sweater or if you have purchased the pattern on Ravelry look for an update that includes this sweater as a separate pdf.

I want to thank everyone who participated in this KAL. It has really been another fun one. A special thank you to my test knitters, Lil and Heli, they made these pattern much more error-free!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Bloomin’ Happy Mitten KAL

We are wrapping up the Wee Winter Woolens KAL, so it’s time to start talking about our mitten KAL for January. January is National Knit Mitten Month after all! This year’s mittens are called Bloomin’ Happy and inspired by the fabric designs of Lotta Jansdotter.

I designed these mittens for me and just wanted a design that was going to make me happy. It is on the modern side versus traditional fair and I would say that these are a more feminine mitten. I will also mention that if you are newer to stranded colorwork you may find these a little trickier because of some longer areas where you will need to catch floats. I’m not saying that these are hard to knit, just that in some places you will be carrying yarn across the whole side of the mitten. I will give you some ideas to change the pattern up a bit, if you don’t want to carry the yarn so much.

Here are a few more notes on the look of the mittens. They have a ribbed cuff with colorwork in the ribbing. The pattern is different on the front and back of the mittens. I have knit my pair with a peasant thumb, but plan on offering the mittens with a side-gore thumb option as well.

KAL Details

  • The KAL starts on Friday, January 5th with the first clue being releases around 8:00am CST.
  • The next three clues will be released on the following Fridays, January 12, 19, and 26.
  • The clues will be available on my site for free or you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry (coming soon). The Ravelry version will be a pdf that will be updated each week, so all the clues are together in the end. The version on my site will remain as four separate pdfs.
  • To join the KAL all you have to do it knit along with us.
  • Feel free to use the image above as your project image on Ravelry, blog, or website.
  • There will be two thread in my Ravelry group for this KAL, one for just links to the clues and one for sharing pictures and chatting.

Yarn
You will need fingering weight yarn in at least two colors, though you can add a third color in the cuff if you wish.
I used approximately 58g/270yds for the 7.5″ wider/longer size – 38g/177yds of the main color, 20g/93yds of contrasting color.
I decided to use a third color in the cuff so I used 17g/79yds of CC1 and 3g/14yds of CC2.

My yarn is Knit Picks Palette in Ciel, White, and Raspberry Heather.

Gauge and Size
In an upcoming post I’ll talk more about choosing which size to knit and gauge.

  • Gauge for these mittens is 10 stitches and 12 rows per inch.
  • The pattern will be available in three widths 7″, 7.5″ and 8″(17.78, 19.05 and 20.32cm).
  • Each width will have two lengths for the hand and thumb.
  • It is important to get gauge to get the stated size.

Other Tools

  • Size needles needed to get gauge. I am using US1/2.25mm. I use dpns, but you can do these in whatever way you prefer to knit in the round.
  • Scrap yarn
  • Tapestry needle
  • Stitch marker

Stay tune for more information as we get closer.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Wee Winter Woolens KAL: Wee Ski Sweater

Let’s knit up another wee sweater. This sweater is inspired by cosy, fair isle ski sweaters.

This is knit like the other two sweaters in the set, but has a little more colorwork. The pattern has instructions and charts for doing this sweater in two colors or three. (Though knowing the creativity of all of you, I betting we’ll see this down up all different ways!)

Download the Wee Ski Sweater Pattern or if you have purchased the pattern on Ravelry look for an update.

This KAL has been so much fun, that I will be adding one more pattern to it which will be up in two weeks!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

On the Needles: Another Sweater for Me and Fox Paws

I’m in one of those spaces right now where I feel like I don’t have enough time to knitting everything I want to knit. And it’s not like I am even knitting present or anything!

I was so happy with my Ravello sweater that I was excited to start another sweater for myself right away. I didn’t have one in mind, then I ran across the newly released Spooner sweater by Yellowcosmo.

Oh, I love a funnel neck and I love the colorwork. I was sold. I thought it would be lovely in alpaca, so I am knitting it in Knit Picks Andean Treasure. I am using a much more subdued palette, as much as I love the original, I cannot pull off yellow or yellowy-greens.

I also have plans to change the front of the sweater, so it doesn’t open. I do like the way it looks, but I know I will wear it more if it is more of a traditional pullover. Hopefully, it’ll be an easy change.

Yarnover, the Minnesota Knitters’ Guild’s convention, is coming up in April. Since it is spring people show off shawls instead of sweaters like they do at Rhinebeck. I started a simple black shawl, but really I’ve been itching to try my hand at Fox Paws by Xandy Peters.

Isn’t that an amazing looking pattern?! You get the look by working stacked decreases and increases. I did the practice pieces the designer provided to get the technique down and then knit up a swatch of one repeat.

This is actually my first swatch. I took it out and did a second one with smaller needles which I prefer. This is going to be quite a project, because it is not mindless knitting. Xandy has written the pattern in a really great way to help you do each row and check your stitch count, but you have to pay attention. One of the local yarn stores here recommended putting in life lines on the most complicated lines, which I just might do.

So, what do you have on your needles?

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Wee Winter Woolens KAL: Wee Norwegian Mitten

It’s time to knit up the last of the mittens in our set. This mitten was inspired by the classic Norwegian mittens with the rows of snowflakes down them.

I do have one tip for knitting this one, use a darker color as the background. I originally knit this in white with blue for the colorwork and just thought it looked off. I realized that doing it in white made it look really skinny, my eye was tricked into thinking the colorwork edging was actually the edge of the mitten. Redoing with the blue as the background made it fit in much better with the set.

Download the Wee Norwegian Mitten Pattern or if you have purchased the pattern on Ravelry look for an update.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Finished Ravello Sweater

I’ve finished my Ravello sweater and am really happy with the results.

Here are all the details…

Pattern: Ravello by Isabell Kraemer

Yarn:
Pale pink – 340 yds of a handspun CVM/angora blend (Not that I spun, but that I bought from the spinner.)
Dark Grey – 922 yds/2 skeins of Juniper Moon Farm Herriot Fine (Alpaca/Nylon) in Black River Stone (Love this yarn!)

This was all I had left! I had to be careful that I had enough pink, so I did the i-cord neck before starting the sleeves. Then I divided the remainder into two equal balls, to make sure I could do the same number of stripes on both sides.

The yarns blocked beautifully and I wore the sweater all day Saturday and it held its shape wonderfully.

Gauge/Needles/Size: I knit this on size 4 needles at a gauge of 6 stitches and 9 rows per inch. The gauge for the pattern was 5.6 stitches and 7.5 rows per inch. To compensate for the difference, I knit a size bigger than my normal size. I did the match and figured out that would work for the width. I had to make some changes in length by adding an inch for the armhole depth after the last increase.

Finishing: The pattern gives options for the neckline finishing, though the original leaves it just as it was cast on. I didn’t like the shape that gave, so I picked up the stitches and did an i-cord bind off. Other than that, the only finishing was weaving in ends.

Changes: The original sweater used three colors. I decided to just stick to two after looking at all the different versions on Ravelry.

The pattern had k2,p1 ribbing on the body and k1,p1 ribbing on the sleeves. I worked the k2,p1 on both. I also did the cuffs on the sleeves longer, so they were the same length as the cuff on the body.

Thoughts: This was a great, well-written pattern. I like that it is top-down, so you can try it on for length as you go. I’m really happy with the fact that the fabric isn’t really bulky, yet it is a warm, cozy sweater. I already have plans to knit another one. Next time, I think I’ll increase the rows between some of the increases at the raglan to get that longer armhole depth.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Food Friday: Quick Pickled Apples

Earlier this month, Matt and I celebrated our anniversary at a Japanese kaiseki dinner. Everything was beautiful and most of the dishes were things I wouldn’t even know where to start making at home. There was one thing I did want to try myself though, pickled apples. They were served to us as a palette cleanser after a course of grilled fish. My first thought was that they’d be wonderful on bbq pork tacos and they were!

We buy pork shoulders and slow cook them with different sauces until they are tender enough to be pulled. Then we divide it into dinner size portions to use in tacos, sandwiches, or just on rice. The sauces vary from Asian-styles to classic bbq. This batch was cooked with Wee Willy’s Texas Pit sauce, it’s one of my favorite bbq sauces we’ve tried. Once the pork is prepared dinner is quick to prepare. I made the apples a half hour before dinner, toasted the tortillas on a griddle, and sliced some green onions. That’s it.

The apples really are the star of this taco. Pickling gives them a real zing that plays against the apples natural sweetness. I liked just snacking on them on their own. Using a crisp apple is important because they retained that crispness even in the pickling brine, think of the crunch of a good deli dill.

Quick Pickled Apples

Use a variety of apple that is crisp and on the sweet side. I used SweeTango.

Ingredients

  • one large or two small apples
  • 1/2 c apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 T sugar
  • 1/8 t salt
  • pinch of red pepper flakes (optional)

1. Mix the vinegar, sugar, salt, and red pepper flakes together in a small plastic container until the sugar and salt have dissolved.

2. Peel, core, and slice the apple. You want the slices to be about 1/4″ at the widest point.

3. Put the apple slices in the vinegar mixture making sure they are all covered.

4. Put the lid on the container and refrigerate for about 30 minute.

Serve.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Wee Winter Woolens KAL: Wee Snowflake Stocking

We are up to the last of the stockings in our set and it is very appropriate since we actually have snow in the forecast this week in Minneapolis!

If you’ve been knitting along, you should find this stocking a snap to knit as it is done just like the others. I think this one might have my favorite colorwork of all the stockings in the set. You could knit this up exactly as I have, but I also think it would be cute with the body of the sock (other than the cuff and heel) all done in one color with the snowflakes and small dots all the same color.

Download the Wee Snowflake Stocking Pattern or if you have purchased the pattern on Ravelry look for an update.

Looking forward to see all your snowflakes!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

Project: Ruana Coat

Weekend before last, one of my favorite crafting partners, my cousin Jenny, came to visit me from Atlanta. We made a stop at REI to get her kids some snow clothes (apparently hard to get in Georgia!) and she fell in love with a wool poncho-type coat. After deciding it was too heavy for down South and just a little too pricey, we left it unpurchased. A few hours later we were in Target and she found this ruana.

(A ruana is a poncho-style outer garment typical of the Andes region of Venezuela and Colombia.)

The plaid was very similar to the coat at REI, but the fleece fabric was much lighter than the wool. Plus is was about ten times less in cost. We thought with a few snaps we could easily turn it into more of a coat like she wanted.

She thought it was just the right weight for “winter” mornings and had a great easy style.

Ruana Coat

Supplies:

  • lightweight fleece 56″ x 48″ or store bought ruana (You could use any fabric you wanted really and make it any size you want. This was the size of the one we bought.)
  • matching thread (optional)
  • small safety pins
  • dressmakers marker
  • 6 heavy duty snaps (or size for your fabric)
  • snap tool
  • velcro (optional)

1. (If you are using a pre-made ruana, skip this step.) If starting with fabric, fold it in half lengthwise. Mark the middle of one side. Cut about 2.5 – 3 inches in on each side from the middle, then curve at the fold for a smooth fit around the neck. (You can just do a straight cut down the middle without losing any fabric, but the curve will lay nicer.)

You can hem the fabric if you wish, but if you are using fleece it isn’t necessary.

2. Put the ruana on and use safety pins to join together where you want your snaps.

For the sides, we put two snaps which divided it into about thirds to create sleeves and close the sides. For the front, we crossed the ruana and put a snap at the top of where we wanted the neckline and towards the bottom of the front piece.

3. Use a dressmakers maker to mark where you want the snaps. Make sure to mark both pieces of fabric so you know where to place the front and back of the snap.

4. Attach the snaps using the instructions on the snap tool.

5. If you find the front piece underneath sags a bit, you can sew or iron-on some velcro at the corner to hold it in place. We didn’t think ours sagged enough to bother.

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish

New Knitting Pattern: Santa Pillow

I love designing things, but hate having to wait to share them with you all so I’m excited to finally share with you a pattern I’ve been working on all year for the book Merry Knitmas available from Knit Picks. (You can also buy the pattern as a separate download.)

Living in Minnesota and being of Swedish descent, my Christmas décor tends to be very Scandinavian in design: red hearts, flickering candles, straw goats, cozy fair isle, and, of course, tomte. Traditionally, a tomte was a domestic sprite who protected the farm. He looked a lot like a gnome with a pointed red head and long white beard. Through the years, the tomte has become more of a Santa Claus figure who delivering presents to children’s homes. On many modern Scandinavian Christmas decorations, the tomte or Santa is depicted in a very modern, triangular shape. The design for this Santa Pillow was inspired by that clean Scandinavian style. While the pattern is just a series of triangles and rectangles with minimal face details there is still a sense of whimsy to it that makes you smile.

The pillow was knit up with Wool of the Andes in worsted weight, so it goes pretty fast. The colorwork is simple especially since I duplicate stitched the eyes on after knitting. One thing I did to keep the red from peeking through the white or cream was keep my floats longer than usual. Since the floats would always be on the inside of the pillow it wasn’t a worry about someone catching them like you would on mittens or a sweater. It was just important not to pull those floats too tight.

I have an ebook version of Merry Knitmas to giveaway! All you need to do is leave a comment on this thread on Ravelry telling us what you are knitting for Christmas this year. I will draw one winner from those comments on Wednesday, October 25th. Good luck!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at http://justcraftyenough.com then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact us at jcraftyenough AT gmail DOT COM. All patterns, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author unless otherwise noted.
© 2005 – 2017 Kathy Lewinski & Susan Cornish